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Notre-Dame, Trump, Volkswagen: Your Tuesday Briefing

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Good morning,

We start today with a devastating fire at the Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris, charges against Volkswagen’s chief executive and a bookstore in London that celebrates overlooked female writers.

The Cathedral of Notre-Dame, the iconic symbol of the beauty and history of Paris, was scarred by an extensive fire on Monday evening that caused its delicate spire to collapse.

By 11 p.m., Jean-Claude Gallet, the Paris fire chief, said that the structure, including the two magnificent towers soaring above the skyline, had been “saved and preserved as a whole,” but that two-thirds of the roof was destroyed. President Emmanuel Macron vowed that the cathedral would be rebuilt.

Our architecture critic looked at the historic cathedral’s symbolism. The fire, he wrote, represents a kind of catastrophe that has “to do with beauty and spirit and symbolism.”

How it started: The cause of the fire was not immediately known, officials said, but Mr. Gallet told television interviewers that the blaze had begun in the interior network of wooden beams, many dating to the Middle Ages. No one was killed or injured, officials said.

Go deeper: We have photos and video of the disaster, and a short history of this scarred jewel of Gothic architecture.

Prosecutors brought criminal charges of aggravated fraud against the executive, Martin Winterkorn, for his role in the automaker’s yearslong effort to deceive regulators about its vehicles’ diesel emissions.

If convicted, Mr. Winterkorn could receive up to 10 years in prison.

Details: German prosecutors said the charges were linked to events from 2006, when the deception was conceived, to 2015, when it first came to light. Prosecutors say Mr. Winterkorn tried to conceal the emissions fraud even after he was told it was beginning to raise questions.

Reminder: Last May, the U.S. Justice Department also charged Mr. Winterkorn with fraud, placing the scandal within Volkswagen’s upper echelons for the first time.


He has used his unpredictability as a source of leverage in discussions with Europe, Canada, Mexico, Japan and elsewhere, but his approach is causing concern among businesses and foreign officials.

European officials have complained about Mr. Trump’s changing the objective of their trade talks. And experts say American partners may feel encouraged to look elsewhere for trade relationships.

Other Trump news: The redacted Mueller report will be released to the public on Thursday, the Justice Department said. Department lawyers will black out secret grand jury testimony, classified information, material related to continuing investigations and other delicate information before then.


As the West burns, the South swelters and the East floods, some Americans are starting to reconsider where they choose to live.

Duluth, Minn., is attracting attention, as climate projections suggest that the Great Lakes area, the region around Duluth, will be one of the few places in America where the effects of climate change may be more easily managed.

The mayor of Duluth has been intrigued by the idea of becoming a climate refuge. “It’s not as cold as you think,” goes one possible slogan. Buffalo has floated the idea as well.

Details: At least once a day, Jesse Keenan, a Harvard lecturer who studies urban development and climate adaptation, gets an email from someone asking where to move to be safe from climate change.

The Times won a Pulitzer Prize on Monday for explanatory reporting in recognition of our investigation into the Trump family’s finances.

President Trump has long sold himself as a self-made billionaire. But an 18-month-long Times investigation found that he received at least $413 million in today’s dollars from his father’s real estate empire, much of it through tax dodges in the 1990s.

He and his siblings set up a sham corporation to disguise millions of dollars in gifts from their parents, records and interviews show.

Read the investigation, the takeaways and the story of how we did it.

Capitol Hill: Congressional investigators issued subpoenas to Deutsche Bank and numerous other banks in an attempt to collect information about President Trump’s finances.

Denmark: After an anti-Muslim provocateur publicly desecrated the Quran in Copenhagen, demonstrations against him on Sunday and early Monday descended into violent clashes between protesters, who set about 70 fires in the streets, and the police, who made 23 arrests.

Serbia: Mirjana Markovic, the influential wife of Slobodan Milosevic, the Serbian leader charged with genocide, died in Russia, where she fled in 2003 to avoid prosecution.

France: A new task force will search for and return artwork that was looted during the Nazi occupation, after years of criticism that restitution efforts were not proactive enough.

Brazil: The American Museum of Natural History, following days of criticism, said it would no longer host an event at the museum by an outside organization that was to have honored President Jair Bolsonaro, whose environmental policies have come under fire.

South Korea: President Moon Jae-in said he wanted to meet again with North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-un, even after Mr. Kim dismissed Mr. Moon’s mediating efforts between the North and the United States as “officious.”

Snapshot: Persephone Books in London, above, is devoted to overlooked works by female writers in the mid-1900s, and the shop is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. “I like books that tell me how we lived,” said Nicola Beauman, its founder. “I’m very, very interested in the novel as social history.”

Health: A hand-held ultrasound scanner called the Butterfly iQ may revolutionize front-line global medicine, especially in rural Africa, Asia and Latin America, where the nearest X-ray machine may be hours away.

Boston Marathon: Lawrence Cherono of Kenya beat Lelisa Desisa of Ethiopia in the men’s field by a mere two seconds, winning in 2:07:57, while Worknesh Degefa of Ethiopia ran away from the field of women, finishing in 2:23:31.

What we’re reading: This essay in The Atlantic. Tom Jolly, who oversees production of our daily print edition, writes: “This is a nice distillation of the joys of reading the newspaper, at your own pace, uninterrupted by texts, calls and general attention-deficit issues. And you can even model your robe for your neighbors!”

Watch: “Teen Spirit,” Max Minghella’s sweet and touching directing debut, is both proudly clichéd and refreshingly different. We made it a Critic’s Pick.


Smarter Living: Simone Davies, an author and Montessori teacher, took our writer through a calming makeover of her children’s playroom. The main idea: Kids play more when there’s less to play with. So toys and books went into a closet, to be rotated out a few at a time. A quilt with pillows marked out a reading corner. Older children’s crafts went into accessible bins. And the baby got a ground-level, stocked play space.

Experts at Wirecutter have recommendations to affordably make your flight less dismal and more enjoyable.

In smaller cities and rural areas of the U.S., demographic decline is a painful reality. Hungary is worried about its declining population. Same with Japan. Even China.

It’s an economic truism: Growing populations drive economies.

But in this era of climate change, is it wiser to have fewer people to house, feed and provide power for?

Globally, a smaller population would “make a difference, certainly,” said Joseph Chamie, a former U.N. population official. “Fewer people means fewer items consumed, and fewer resources used, so your carbon footprint would be less.”

But limiting population growth, he said, can’t solve the environmental problems caused by mass production and consumption, especially in wealthier parts of the world.

And companies whose business models rely on constant growth have little incentive to change. More customers and more consumption mean more profits.

“We can try to maintain the quality of the environment,” Mr. Chamie said. “But we have to change our mind-set regarding how the economy moves.”


That’s it for this briefing. See you next time.

— Melina


Thank you
To Mark Josephson, Eleanor Stanford and James K. Williamson for the break from the news. James also wrote today’s Back Story. You can reach the team at [email protected].

P.S.
• We’re listening to “The Daily.” Our latest episode is about Julian Assange.
• Here’s today’s mini crossword puzzle, and a clue: Exaggerate one’s fall, in soccer (4 letters). You can find all our puzzles here.
• The New York Times won two Pulitzer Prizes on Monday, one for the Trump tax story we featured today, and one for Brent Staples’s editorial writing, which helped redefine the history of race in America.



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The Mueller Report Is 448 Pages Long. You Need to Know These 7 Key Things.

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The special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, produced a report of more than 400 pages that painted a deeply unflattering picture of President Trump but stopped short of accusing him of criminal wrongdoing. Here are seven takeaways.

When Attorney General Jeff Sessions told Mr. Trump that a special counsel had been appointed in May 2017, Mr. Trump grew angry: “I’m fucked,” he said, believing his presidency was ruined. He told Mr. Sessions, “This is the worst thing that ever happened to me.”

Mr. Trump began trying to get rid of Mr. Mueller, only to be thwarted by his staff. In instance after instance, his staff acted as a bulwark against Mr. Trump’s most destructive impulses. In June 2017, the president instructed Donald F. McGahn II, the White House counsel, to remove Mr. Mueller, but Mr. McGahn resisted. Rather than carry out the president’s order, he decided he would rather resign.

Two days later, Mr. Trump asked another trusted adviser, Corey Lewandowski, to tell Mr. Sessions to end the investigation. Mr. Lewandowski did not want to, so he punted to a colleague, Rick Dearborn. He, too, “was uncomfortable with the task and did not follow through.”

Mr. Trump was angry that Mr. Sessions recused himself from the investigation. (Vol. II, Page 78)


One of the unanswered questions of the past two years — which helped fuel the F.B.I. investigation, congressional inquiries and journalistic scrutiny — is why so many people lied, changed their stories and issued misleading statements to both the public and federal authorities.

The report recaps one false statement after another. Just a few examples:

Mr. Trump was livid when journalists revealed that he had unsuccessfully ordered Mr. Mueller’s firing. The president tried to get Mr. McGahn to say publicly that was false, but Mr. McGahn refused, saying that the news reports were accurate. Mr. Mueller’s report notably declared that Mr. McGahn was “credible.”

Mr. Trump also pressed the deputy attorney general, Rod J. Rosenstein, to give a news conference about the firing of the F.B.I. director, James B. Comey. The White House press office wanted Mr. Rosenstein to say it was his idea. Mr. Rosenstein told the president that a news conference was a bad idea “because if the press asked him, he would tell the truth.”


The president has spent the past two years denouncing the news media. He has repeatedly accused reporters of making up sources to destroy his presidency. The report, though, shows not only that some of the most unflattering stories about Mr. Trump were accurate, but also that White House officials knew that was the case even as they heaped criticism on journalists.

In May 2017, for instance, The New York Times disclosed that Mr. Trump had asked Mr. Comey to end the F.B.I.’s investigation into the president’s national security adviser, Michael T. Flynn. Mr. Trump tweeted, “I never asked Comey to stop investigating Flynn. Just more Fake News covering another Comey lie!”

“Despite those denials,” Mr. Mueller wrote, “substantial evidence corroborates Comey’s account.”

In another instance, Mr. Trump appeared to use criticism of the news media as a legal strategy. He attacked a Times article suggesting that his former lawyer, Michael D. Cohen, might cooperate with the Justice Department and provide information about Mr. Trump.


Mr. Trump was quick to declare the report a total vindication.

But federal authorities went out of their way not to exonerate Mr. Trump. They wrote that his conduct in office “presents difficult issues that prevent us from conclusively determining that no criminal conduct occurred.”

If the evidence cleared the president, Mr. Mueller would have said so. It didn’t. (Vol. II, Page 8)


Mr. Trump repeatedly said he was eager to sit for an interview with Mr. Mueller’s team, despite his lawyers’ insistence that doing so would be a terrible idea.

The report makes clear why his lawyers were so worried about it. Mr. Mueller had a huge cache of unanswered questions, misleading and conflicting statements, and unexplained actions with which to confront the president. Sitting for an interview, the report makes clear, would have exposed Mr. Trump to far more problems.

Mr. Mueller said he chose not to subpoena the president because a court fight would delay the investigation. But that decision meant that the authorities were never able to ask the central question in the obstruction case: What was Mr. Trump thinking when he tried repeatedly to undermine the federal investigation?

Mr. Mueller believed he had the authority to subpoena the president. (Vol. II, Page 13)


Mr. Mueller makes explicit what Mr. Trump has repeatedly cast doubt on: Russia secretly manipulated the 2016 presidential election.

The investigation ultimately found no evidence that anyone from Mr. Trump’s campaign participated in that effort, but the report reveals in stark detail the many suspicious interactions that had the F.B.I. so worried. Many of those have been reported, but the report amounts to a compendium that helps explain the origins of the F.B.I. investigation, known as “Crossfire Hurricane.”

For instance, it has long been known that George Papadopoulos, a young campaign aide, was told that the Russian government had “dirt” on Hillary Clinton in the form of thousands of emails. But the report goes much further, revealing that Mr. Papadopoulos suggested an explicit offer by the Russian government to work with the Trump campaign to sabotage Mrs. Clinton.

Mr. Papadopoulos indicated that Russia wanted to coordinate with the Trump campaign. (Vol. I, Page 89)


Prosecutors describe a president who was preoccupied with ending a federal investigation, a White House that repeatedly told misleading and changing stories, and a presidential campaign that was in repeated contact with Russian officials for reasons that are not always clear.

Even though prosecutors concluded that didn’t amount to provably criminal conduct, the report is astounding in its sweep. Yet it is also a reminder of how much the public has learned over the past two years about Mr. Trump’s conduct.

If the American public or members of Congress were learning these things for the first time, the political fallout would normally be devastating. The consequences of the report remain to be seen, but if people are not surprised or shocked by the revelations, then Mr. Trump may have benefited by the steady drip of news stories he has so loudly criticized.

The special counsel suggests a pattern of behavior by Mr. Trump to harm the investigation. (Vol. II, Page 157)





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The Mueller Report Is 448 Pages Long. You Need to Know These 7 Key Things.

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The special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, produced a report of more than 400 pages that painted a deeply unflattering picture of President Trump but stopped short of accusing him of criminal wrongdoing. Here are seven takeaways.

When Attorney General Jeff Sessions told Mr. Trump that a special counsel had been appointed in May 2017, Mr. Trump grew angry: “I’m fucked,” he said, believing his presidency was ruined. He told Mr. Sessions, “This is the worst thing that ever happened to me.”

Mr. Trump began trying to get rid of Mr. Mueller, only to be thwarted by his staff. In instance after instance, his staff acted as a bulwark against Mr. Trump’s most destructive impulses. In June 2017, the president instructed Donald F. McGahn II, the White House counsel, to remove Mr. Mueller, but Mr. McGahn resisted. Rather than carry out the president’s order, he decided he would rather resign.

One of the unanswered questions of the past two years — which helped fuel the F.B.I. investigation, congressional inquiries and journalistic scrutiny — is why so many people lied, changed their stories and issued misleading statements to both the public and federal authorities.

The report recaps one false statement after another. Just a few examples:

Mr. Trump was livid when journalists revealed that he had unsuccessfully ordered Mr. Mueller’s firing. The president tried to get Mr. McGahn to say publicly that was false, but Mr. McGahn refused, saying that the news reports were accurate. Mr. Mueller’s report notably declared that Mr. McGahn was “credible.”

Mr. Trump also pressed the deputy attorney general, Rod J. Rosenstein, to give a news conference about the firing of the F.B.I. director, James B. Comey. The White House press office wanted Mr. Rosenstein to say it was his idea. Mr. Rosenstein told the president that a news conference was a bad idea “because if the press asked him, he would tell the truth.”

The White House press secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, admitted issuing a statement to the news media “in the heat of the moment that was not founded on anything.”

No, F.B.I. agents didn’t actually call the White House offering support for Mr. Comey’s firing. (Vol. II, Page 72)

Mr. Mueller can’t explain why the stories about Mr. Comey’s firing keep changing. (Vol. II, Page 77)


The president has spent the past two years denouncing the news media. He has repeatedly accused reporters of making up sources to destroy his presidency. The report, though, shows not only that some of the most unflattering stories about Mr. Trump were accurate, but also that White House officials knew that was the case even as they heaped criticism on journalists.

In May 2017, for instance, The New York Times disclosed that Mr. Trump had asked Mr. Comey to end the F.B.I.’s investigation into the president’s national security adviser, Michael T. Flynn. Mr. Trump tweeted, “I never asked Comey to stop investigating Flynn. Just more Fake News covering another Comey lie!”

“Despite those denials,” Mr. Mueller wrote, “substantial evidence corroborates Comey’s account.”

In another instance, Mr. Trump appeared to use criticism of the news media as a legal strategy. He attacked a Times article suggesting that his former lawyer, Michael D. Cohen, might cooperate with the Justice Department and provide information about Mr. Trump.


Mr. Trump was quick to declare the report a total vindication.

But federal authorities went out of their way not to exonerate Mr. Trump. They wrote that his conduct in office “presents difficult issues that prevent us from conclusively determining that no criminal conduct occurred.”

If the evidence cleared the president, Mr. Mueller would have said so. It didn’t. (Vol. II, Page 8)


Mr. Trump repeatedly said he was eager to sit for an interview with Mr. Mueller’s team, despite his lawyers’ insistence that doing so would be a terrible idea.

The report makes clear why his lawyers were so worried about it. Mr. Mueller had a huge cache of unanswered questions, misleading and conflicting statements, and unexplained actions with which to confront the president. Sitting for an interview, the report makes clear, would have exposed Mr. Trump to far more problems.

Mr. Mueller said he chose not to subpoena the president because a court fight would delay the investigation. But that decision meant that the authorities were never able to ask the central question in the obstruction case: What was Mr. Trump thinking when he tried repeatedly to undermine the federal investigation?

Mr. Mueller believed he had the authority to subpoena the president. (Vol. II, Page 13)


Mr. Mueller makes explicit what Mr. Trump has repeatedly cast doubt on: Russia secretly manipulated the 2016 presidential election.

The investigation ultimately found no evidence that anyone from Mr. Trump’s campaign participated in that effort, but the report reveals in stark detail the many suspicious interactions that had the F.B.I. so worried. Many of those have been reported, but the report amounts to a compendium that helps explain the origins of the F.B.I. investigation, known as “Crossfire Hurricane.”

For instance, it has long been known that George Papadopoulos, a young campaign aide, was told that the Russian government had “dirt” on Hillary Clinton in the form of thousands of emails. But the report goes much further, revealing that Mr. Papadopoulos suggested an explicit offer by the Russian government to work with the Trump campaign to sabotage Mrs. Clinton.

Mr. Papadopoulos indicated that Russia wanted to coordinate with the Trump campaign. (Vol. I, Page 89)


Prosecutors describe a president who was preoccupied with ending a federal investigation, a White House that repeatedly told misleading and changing stories, and a presidential campaign that was in repeated contact with Russian officials for reasons that are not always clear.

Even though prosecutors concluded that didn’t amount to provably criminal conduct, the report is astounding in its sweep. Yet it is also a reminder of how much the public has learned over the past two years about Mr. Trump’s conduct.

If the American public or members of Congress were learning these things for the first time, the political fallout would normally be devastating. The consequences of the report remain to be seen, but if people are not surprised or shocked by the revelations, then Mr. Trump may have benefited by the steady drip of news stories he has so loudly criticized.

The special counsel suggests a pattern of behavior by Mr. Trump to harm the investigation. (Vol. II, Page 157)





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Peace Conference Plans Derailed as Taliban Object to Afghan Delegation

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After several rounds of talks, the Taliban and American negotiators seem to be near a deal on major issues, including the withdrawal of American troops and a Taliban guarantee that international terrorist groups will not be allowed on Afghan soil. But that progress cannot be finalized until Afghans negotiate a political future for the country after the American withdrawal.

After the latest round of talks with Americans last month, the Taliban had quietly agreed to the participation, in a private capacity, of some government officials in the conference this weekend. But they regarded the final list of participants as essentially a government delegation, according to Taliban representatives and Western diplomats. It did not help that the office of Afghanistan’s president, Ashraf Ghani, in announcing the list on Tuesday, called it “the delegation of the government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan.”

Soon after the list’s release, the Taliban’s main spokesman, Zabihullah Mujahid, said in a statement that the Qatari hosts had made it clear “both in written and verbal form” that no one at the conference would be representing the government, and that any official who was there would be participating in a personal capacity.

“The creators of the Kabul list must realize that this is an orderly and prearranged conference in a faraway Gulf country and not an invitation to some wedding or other party at a hotel in Kabul,” Mr. Mujahid said, alluding to the large number of participants.

Even before the latest complication, the makeup of the delegation had been a divisive issue for the political elite in Kabul. The peace talks are overlapping with national elections, in which Mr. Ghani is seeking another five-year term, and the question of who would participate in the conference was caught up in domestic political jostling with every player wanting a piece.

Mr. Ghani’s camp sees the opposition forces, normally divided, as united in one goal: using the peace process to topple him. For their part, opposition groups, along with some Western diplomats, regard Mr. Ghani’s team as stubborn, not genuinely committed to any peace efforts they cannot control, and firm in the belief that they have a better chance at retaining power if the talks are scuttled.



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