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In Attacking Ilhan Omar, Trump Revives His Familiar Refrain Against Muslims

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WASHINGTON — President Trump has often seen the political benefits of stigmatizing Muslims.

During the 2016 campaign, he would not rule out creating a registry of Muslims in the United States. He claimed to have seen “thousands” of Muslims cheering on rooftops in New Jersey after Sept. 11, a statement that was widely debunked. And after the deadly attacks in Paris and California, Mr. Trump called for a moratorium on Muslims traveling to the United States.

“I think Islam hates us,” Mr. Trump told Anderson Cooper, the CNN host.

Now, with 19 months until the 2020 election, Mr. Trump is seeking to rally his base by sounding that theme again. And this time, he has a specific target: Representative Ilhan Omar, Democrat of Minnesota and one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress.

In Ms. Omar, a Somali refugee whose family received asylum in the United States when she was a teenager, Mr. Trump has found a perfect foil: a progressive Democrat whose embrace of the boycott-Israel movement and attacks on supporters of the Jewish state have already made her a divisive figure within her own party. As the first woman to wear a hijab on the House floor — she pushed for a rules change to allow it — she is also a powerful, and visible symbol for Muslims and refugees.

Mr. Trump and his team are trying to make Ms. Omar, who is relatively unknown in national politics, a household name, to be seen as the most prominent voice of the Democratic Party, regardless of her actual position. In February, the president pounced when Ms. Omar unleashed a firestorm with her comments on Israel, rejecting her subsequent apology and calling for her to resign.

“Congressman Omar is terrible, what she said,” Mr. Trump told reporters.

Ms. Omar, said Sam Nunberg, a 2016 campaign aide to Mr. Trump, “is the perfect embodiment of the sharp contrast President Trump wants to paint for 2020,” one he thinks “gives the president a chance to expand his support closer to 50 percent.”

And the contrast the president drew in a video he tweeted out on Friday was not subtle.

Against the backdrop of graphic images of the World Trade Center during the Sept. 11 attacks, the video repeatedly quotes a portion of a speech Ms. Omar gave at an event hosted by the Council on American-Islamic Relations, describing how the group was founded after the attacks “because they recognized that some people did something and that all of us were starting to lose access to our civil liberties.”

The video focused only on the words “some people did something,” implying that Ms. Omar was playing down what had happened. Juxtaposed was Mr. Trump’s comment in capital letters: “WE WILL NEVER FORGET.”

Mr. Trump’s electoral success in 2016 was based partly on culture wars and fears among an older, white voting base that the country it knew was slipping away. Like his hard line on immigration, his plays on fears of Muslims — including consistently conflating Islam with terrorism — proved polarizing among the wider electorate, but helped him keep a tight grip on his most enthusiastic voters. In the South Carolina Republican primary in February 2016, for instance, exit polls showed that 75 percent of voters favored his proposed Muslim ban.

Mr. Trump has privately said his language about Muslims has been received well among his base. His advisers and friends acknowledge that, in effect, he is trying to re-create some of the same conditions of the 2016 campaign.

Now, as he looks toward 2020, he is betting the issue can deliver for him again. It is a strategy that will provoke criticism that he is summoning dark forces in American society, a point that Ms. Omar made in a statement Sunday evening.

“Since the president’s tweet Friday evening, I have experienced an increase in direct threats on my life — many directly referencing or replying to the president’s video,” Ms. Omar said. “This is endangering lives. It has to stop.”

Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary, denied that Mr. Trump meant any harm by the video. “Certainly the president is wishing no ill will and certainly not violence toward anyone,” she said.

But Democrats across the philosophical spectrum — from members of the Congressional Black Caucus to centrists like Representative Josh Gottheimer of New Jersey, one of Ms. Omar’s most vocal critics — expressed alarm at the way Ms. Omar was singled out.

“Since Ilhan came to national attention and throughout her tenure in Congress she has been a target of these right-wing extremists; that’s why we’re standing up for her,” said Representative Bennie Thompson, Democrat of Mississippi and the chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee. “This isn’t the first time that President Trump has targeted her and people like her.”

Mr. Gottheimer, though less partisan, denounced the threats against Ms. Omar, adding, “The response to different points of view in our country must never be threats of physical harm or violence.”

Representative Jerrold Nadler, Democrat of New York, who has also been critical of Ms. Omar, singled out Mr. Trump’s own reaction to the events of Sept 11. “He has no moral authority to be talking about 9/11 at all,” he said, noting that Mr. Trump’s real estate company applied for and received grants after the attacks that were intended for small businesses affected by the devastation.

Geoff Garin, a veteran Democratic strategist, predicted that Mr. Trump’s use of such graphic images from one of the nation’s darkest days would backfire for the president.

“Voters are turned off by the use of 9/11 for political purposes, and my guess is that moderate voters are going to see Trump’s use of that as both ugly and extreme,” Mr. Garin said. “I think his over-the-top exploitation of 9/11 is going to turn more voters off than he wins over by attacking the Democrats on this.”

On a quick trip on Monday to Ms. Omar’s home state of Minnesota to hold an economic round table at a trucking company, the president made no mention of her. Outside, however, the debate over Ms. Omar was raucous.

The president’s supporters, in trademark red hats on one side of the road, chanted “Trump 2020” and “Omar divides” with the occasional “CAIR is Hamas” sign, in reference to the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

Across the street, chanting “This is what Democracy looks like” and singing “This Little Light of Mine,” protesters waved “I stand with Ilhan” signs and banners.



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North Carolina Coach Sylvia Hatchell Resigns After Investigation

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Sylvia Hatchell, the Hall of Fame women’s basketball coach at the University of North Carolina, has resigned less than three weeks after she was suspended amid a university-ordered investigation into her program.

The university announced the resignation Thursday night.

Ms. Hatchell had been accused of making racially insensitive remarks in front of the team. A lawyer for Ms. Hatchell has said his client’s words were misquoted or misconstrued.

But the university’s statement said the investigation, which included interviews with 28 people connected to the program, had concluded that there was “widespread support” to back up allegations that Ms. Hatchell had “made comments that were racially insensitive, and when confronted by players and staff did not respond in a timely or appropriate manner.”

The investigation also determined that players and members of the medical staff believed that Ms. Hatchell had tried to exercise undue influence over the treatment of injuries and had been perceived as pressuring injured athletes to play.

““The University commissioned a review of our women’s basketball program, which found issues that led us to conclude that the program needed to be taken in a new direction,” North Carolina’s athletic director, Bubba Cunningham, said in the statement. “It is in the best interests of our university and student-athletes for us to do so. Coach Hatchell agrees, and she offered her resignation today. I accepted it.”

Hatchell was also quoted in the statement. “The game of basketball has given me so much, but now it is time for me to step away,” she said, before referring to her bout with cancer that began in 2013. “This is an idea I have been contemplating since my cure from leukemia.”

After the final game of this season, the families of several players met with university officials to air concerns, according to people with knowledge of the meeting who requested anonymity because they feared retaliation if they spoke publicly. Within days, Ms. Hatchell and her assistants were put on paid administrative leave while a law firm conducted a review.

The future of the assistant coaches was not addressed in the statement.

A person with direct knowledge of the accusations told The New York Times that Ms. Hatchell had warned that a loss could lead to “nooses” for the players, had complained that her team played like “old mules” and had urged players to do a tomahawk chop war cry.

Ms. Hatchell, 67, coached at North Carolina for 33 seasons, was elected to the Basketball Hall of Fame in 2013 and won the national title in 1994.

Recent seasons have been less successful. The team finished 18-15 this season and returned to the N.C.A.A. tournament for the first time in four years, losing in the first round.

Several highly regarded players have transferred out of the program in recent years, notably Diamond DeShields, who despite a strong freshman season moved on to Tennessee in 2014.



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Police Officer Wounded in Wild Shootout in Upper Manhattan

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A plainclothes officer was wounded in an exchange of gunfire with an armed man in Upper Manhattan on Thursday afternoon, the police said. The gunman was fatally shot.

The shooting occurred at about 4:30 p.m. inside a paid parking lot on Broadway near West 187th Street, in the Washington Heights neighborhood, the police said.

The officer, who was not immediately identified, was taken to Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital with a wound under his right arm, the police said. He was expected to survive.

The gunman, who also was not identified, was hit in the chest and died a half-hour later at a nearby hospital, the police said. A black handgun was recovered from him. Early reports that there were two gunmen turned out to be false.

The incident began at 4:24 p.m. when a 911 caller reported that someone was firing a gun at the corner of Wadsworth Avenue and 187th Street, the police commissioner, James P. O’Neill, said during a news conference at the Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital.

Moments later, two plainclothes officers from the 34th Precinct arrived in an unmarked car and spotted a man with a gun fleeing down 187th Street toward Broadway, Mr. O’Neill said.

One of the officers got out of the car and chased the gunman on foot as he ran around the corner and into a parking lot on Broadway. The fleeing man hid behind a car at the back of the lot and fired three rounds, hitting the officer under his right arm. The wounded officer managed to fire back once.

“The amount of courage this police officer showed is quite unbelievable,” Mr. O’Neill said.

Then, the second officer barreled into the parking lot in the unmarked police car, jumped out and started firing from behind the driver’s side door, the commissioner said. He squeezed off three shots at the gunman. One of the gunman’s bullets went through the windshield of the police car where the driver sits.

“This was a fast, intense episode,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said. “We saw, from the video we observed, a very, very dangerous situation unfold.”

The shootout was filmed by a security camera and by one of the officer’s body cameras, the police said.

Ahuva Kaplan, 25, who lives across the street from the scene, said she witnessed the events through her window. She saw the man hide behind a car and draw a gun. “They chased him into the parking lot,” she said. “Then I heard gunshots, about five.”

She said many more officers arrived over the next few minutes. “A loud speaker on a police car said, come out! Come out!” Mrs. Kaplan said. “They were trying to get him out and there was more fire. He was behind a car, hiding.”

On Thursday evening, dozens of officers combed through the parking lot, sandwiched between two buildings on the east side of Broadway, looking for evidence.

Jorge Ozuna, 65, said he was walking nearby when he heard shots ring out. “It came from inside a parking lot,” Mr. Ozuna said. “A lot of police officers came running with guns in their hands.”

A few minutes later, he said, the wounded officer was carried away by two other officers.

“He seemed alert, conscious,” Mr. Ozuna said. “He was touching his hurt arm.”

Father Ambiorix Rodriguez said he was preparing for Mass at the St. Elizabeth Church on Wadsworth Avenue and 187th Street when he began getting messages about the gunshots and the wounded officer.

“As soon as I heard I began praying for him,” he said. “We have had some shootings here recently.”

Edgar Sandoval contributed reporting.



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Your Friday Briefing – The New York Times

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In 448 pages, the special counsel, Robert Mueller, cataloged attempts by President Trump to thwart the investigation into Russia’s 2016 election interference, and laid bare how Mr. Trump was elected with the help of a foreign power.

The special counsel’s team decided not to charge Mr. Trump, citing numerous legal and factual constraints, but it pointedly declined to exonerate him. Mr. Mueller concluded that there was “insufficient evidence” to establish a criminal conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Russia, but that Russia did interfere in the U.S. election.

Takeaways: President Trump tried to sabotage the investigation. In instance after instance, his staff defied his orders and acted as a bulwark against Mr. Trump’s most destructive impulses. Read our other takeaways. We also have a cheat sheet to the report.

On obstruction: President Trump’s lawyers have argued that it was impossible for him to illegally obstruct the Russia investigation because he has full authority over federal law enforcement. Mr. Mueller rejected that sweeping view of executive power.

See for yourself: One of our most-read stories in the last day was the report itself. Many readers wanted to comb through the 400-plus pages.


American-led sanctions against North Korea are hurting its leader, Kim Jong-un, in a new way: by targeting the party and military elite who support his totalitarian rule.

Previous international sanctions were aimed at preventing North Korea from acquiring weapons, but newer penalties have hit its lucrative exports — the regime’s main source of income.

North Korea’s test of a “guided tactical weapon” on Wednesday might be both a sign of Mr. Kim’s frustration and a warning to Washington that there will be no progress on nuclear disarmament unless the sanctions are eased.

What’s next: Mr. Kim said recently that he would give the U.S. until the end of the year to come up with proposals around the deadlock, an implicit warning that North Korea might resume nuclear and intercontinental missile testing. Wednesday’s test suggested he might raise the stakes sooner.


An outwardly cordial meeting this week between Pope Francis and his predecessor, the pope emeritus, Benedict XVI, masked a growing concern within the Vatican and far beyond: that having two popes can be confusing to the faithful — and can risk creating schisms within the Roman Catholic Church.

Francis and Benedict are vastly different in their style, substance and visions of the church. Benedict has remained an icon to traditionalists who feel threatened by Francis, a pope they consider a dictator, a liberal radical and an existential threat to church doctrine.

The background: In 2013, Benedict became the first pontiff in centuries to resign, but he hasn’t disappeared completely from view. Last week, he released a 6,000-word letter explaining his views on the church’s clerical sex abuse crisis, effectively undercutting Francis on the issue.

The Indian elections are an unruly behemoth, not only to administer but also to monitor. Thousands of candidates deliver campaign speeches and post on social media at the same time.

The Sisyphean task of keeping an eye on it all falls to the Election Commission.

Already, it has temporarily banned two candidates from campaigning for making incendiary remarks, postponed the release of a Bollywood biopic of Prime Minister Narendra Modi and canceled voting in one district after uncovering a cash-for-votes scheme.

The commission faces perhaps its greatest test of legitimacy in trying to rein in disinformation in a country with more than 600 million internet users.

In the past year, rumors on social media have led to fatal lynch mobs across the country. Two phases into a seven-stage election, there has already been an explosion of fake poll results, doctored news clippings and other election-related falsehoods, according to a fact-checking website.

The commission can count some successes. WhatsApp, Twitter, Facebook and other platforms have taken down posts that violate the commission’s rules, and developed tools to curb the spread of falsehoods. But concerns remain. — Alisha Haridasani Gupta

Send us your feedback or questions on this series here.

France: There is already a growing debate about how the Notre-Dame cathedral should be rebuilt. How closely should the planned reconstruction adhere to the original design and materials?

Pinterest: Shares in the digital pin board jumped more than 28 percent on its first day of trading as a public company. The company’s stock began trading at $23.75, above the initial public offering price of $19, and finished the day at $24.40. It is more valuable than the retail chains Macy’s or Nordstrom.

Germany: After a bus plunged off a road on the Portuguese island of Madeira and killed 29 tourists, possibly all Germans, Chancellor Angela Merkel said she was “saddened and distressed” by the crash, as her nation awaited word of the victims’ identities.

Health: Two new studies confirm there are biological reasons that some people struggle with their weight and others do not. Some people have a gene alteration that suppresses appetite and makes them feel full.

Amazon: The world’s largest retailer and eight South American countries that contain the world’s largest rain forest are in a battle over who owns the name Amazon. At stake is the domain name .amazon — for the company, it means marketing opportunities, and for the countries, it’s a question of heritage and symbolism.

Snapshot: Gardens, like the Montreal Botanical Garden, above, have healing power, according to Oliver Sacks, a neurologist and author who died in 2015. In a collection of essays being published posthumously next week, he wrote that in 40 years of medical practice, “I have seen in my patients the restorative and healing powers of nature and gardens.”

Britain: We spoke with David Miliband, the former British politician who is now the chief executive of the International Rescue Committee, a nonprofit humanitarian group. “I sort of came to the conclusion that, if you can make a difference, you should,” he said.

Music: Our reviewer said “Homecoming,” the highly anticipated Netflix documentary made by Beyoncé, reinforces the idea that Beyoncé the performer is also Beyoncé the creator.

Cook: This ultra-tangy tart is somewhere between a lemon tart and a lemon pie.

Go: Lucian Freud’s nudes from the ’90s, a Gretchen Bender retrospective and more are among what you should see in New York art galleries.

Watch: What is remarkable about “Ramy,” Hulu’s new show about a young American Muslim, isn’t that it significantly differs from other millennial coming-of-age stories. It’s that it doesn’t.

Read: Far-right nationalists are now in power in governments across Europe. How surprised should supporters of liberal democracy in Europe be? Not very, according to Sheri Berman’s “Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe.


Smarter Living: Checking to see if something can be repaired before you replace it is a simple way to save money and the Earth. YouTube has plenty of instructional videos, and iFixit offers how-to guides and repair discussion forums. In Europe, repair parties and cafes are starting to spring up. There’s also a movement to support “right to repair” laws that would require companies to make their products easier to fix.

And we have guidance on the right way to use a public bathroom.


As we’ve been covering the fire that tore through the Cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris, we’ve often wondered why it’s not just Notre Dame. Why would Our Lady Cathedral need extra punctuation?

We got the answer from the national commission that preserves and guides France’s conventions of official names. (The French have earned their reputation for being literate, logical and bureaucratic.)

Elisabeth Calvarin, who helps lead that agency, the Commission Nationale de Toponymie, explained that the hyphen differentiates place names from proper nouns.

The mother of God who is worshiped at the cathedral is Notre Dame. The cathedral named for her must have a hyphen. Part of the landmark’s address is named after a pope: Place Jean-Paul II. Saint Denis is the martyr; Saint-Denis is the name of the Paris suburb.

But it’s Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris. Why do the hyphens stop halfway through?

Because France has many churches and cathedrals listed as Notre-Dame, adding the name of the location is helpful — but not registered officially.


That’s it for this briefing. See you next time.

— Melina


Thank you
Katie Van Syckle helped compile today’s briefing. Mark Josephson, Eleanor Stanford and Kenneth R. Rosen provided the break from the news. Daphné Anglès, in our Paris Bureau, reported today’s Back Story, and we also received guidance from the French Studies Program at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y. You can reach the team at [email protected].

P.S.
• We’re listening to “The Daily.” Today’s episode is the second of a two-part series on abortion.
• Here’s today’s mini crossword puzzle, and a clue: CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, etc. (5 letters). You can find all our puzzles here.
• The New York Times takes great care with its use of hyphens. For instance, we use the hyphen in compounds denoting national origin, like Japanese-American, but not when the phrase denotes current group membership rather than origin, as in French Canadian.



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